Jonathan M. Katz is a freelance journalist based in Durham, NC.


U.N. Admits Role in Cholera Epidemic in Haiti - Aug. 17, 2016 - For the first time since a cholera epidemic believed to be imported by United Nations peacekeepers began killing thousands of Haitians nearly six years ago, the office of Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has acknowledged that the United Nations played a role in the initial outbreak and that a “significant new set of U.N. actions” will be needed to respond to the crisis.

U.S. Wants Former Salvadoran Ally to Face Justice in 1989 Massacre - Sept. 13, 2015 - This quiet shift, taking place in hidden discussions and nearly empty courtrooms, is a sign of how much has and has not changed since the end of the Cold War. Championed by human rights advocates and condemned by critics who say it amounts to selling out old allies, the move speaks to the ever-complicated relationship between American foreign policy and human rights around the world.

Shooting Unarmed Black Man Was Self-Defense, Officer’s Lawyer Tells Charlotte Jury - Aug. 18, 2015 - The lawyer for a white Charlotte police officer charged with voluntary manslaughter concluded his defense on Tuesday by shifting accusations onto the black former college football player who died in the 2013 shooting, portraying the unarmed victim as a would-be burglar who dared the police to kill him.

In Chapel Hill, Suspect's Rage Went Beyond a Parking Dispute - March 3, 2015 - A motive for the shooting may never be known. But interviews with more than a dozen of the victims’ friends and family members, lawyers, police officers and others make two central points: Before the shootings, the students took concerted steps to appease a menacing neighbor, and none were parked that day in a way that would have set off an incident involving their cars.

René Préval, President of Haiti in 2010 Quake, Dies at 74 - March 3, 2017 - A man of quiet demeanor in a country with a politically raucous history, he was best known for what did not happen to him: He was neither assassinated nor overthrown.

Anti-Gay Laws Bring Backlash in Mississippi and North Carolina - April 5, 2016 - The divide between social conservatives and diversity-minded corporations widened with developments in Mississippi and North Carolina related to the rights of gay, lesbian bisexual and transgender people in both states.

At Service for Dallas Ebola Victim, Relatives Recall a Gentle, Generous ManOct. 18, 2014 - “Let’s not forget how he died. He died helping someone,” said Harry Korkoryah, Mr. Duncan’s half brother. “He answered that call from God.”

See more of Jonathan's work at nytimes.com

 


In Exile - Jan. 13, 2016 - Deportations and violence have driven tens of thousands of people of Haitian descent from their homes in the Dominican Republic — while the world is silent.

The U.N.'s Cholera Admission and What Comes Next - Aug. 19, 2016 - This week, a phrase came out of United Nations headquarters that I thought I would never hear. 

Reporting on Zika When You Have Zika - Feb. 8, 2016 - There’s a lot we don’t know about the Zika virus, but there’s one thing I’m sure of: I had it last month. 

What Happened to North Carolina? - Oct. 7, 2016 - It is also Exhibit A of the partisan self-sorting that has defined national politics in recent decades; a trend that has produced violent mood swings. 

How Not to Report on an Earthquake - April 28, 2015 - These myths come with consequences. Rash decisions made in the heady days after a disaster, when everyone is committed to the response and the money is flush, are fiendishly difficult to undo.

See more of Jonathan's work at nytimes.com/magazine


The King and Queen of Haiti - May 4, 2015 - No country more clearly illustrates the confusing nexus of Hillary Clinton’s State Department and Bill Clinton’s foundation than Haiti—America’s poorest neighbor.

The Clintons' Haiti Screw-Up, As Told By Hillary's Emails - Sept. 2, 2015 - The family still doesn't know how to wield its own power.

The Man Who Launched the GOP's Civil War - Oct. 1, 2015 - How a textile magnate turned the Party of Lincoln into the Party of Trump.

In North Carolina, Some Democrats See Their Grim Future - Dec. 27, 2016 - The GOP's moves have many on the left worried their bare-knuckle tactics will spread nationally.


The Secretary-General In His Labyrinth - March 3, 2015 - When Ban Ki-moon was a child, the United Nations saved his village from a war. Can he save the U.N. from irrelevance?

Jean-Claude Duvalier Is Dead, But He Will Haunt Haiti for Years to Come - Oct. 6, 2014 - Though he was a dictator, Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier is remembered best for rarely being in control. 

Diplomacy in the Shadow of Terror Nov. 30, 2015 - “Paris,” I told him. He mulled this over. “Well, you be careful,” he finally offered, reassuringly.

Who Wants What in the Final Climate DealDec. 11, 2015 - LE BOURGET, France—The circus ended today.

See more of Jonathan's work, including his full coverage of the 2015 Paris Climate Talks, at newrepublic.com


The Red Cross Won’t Save Houston - Aug. 28, 2017 - There is too much focus on the American Red Cross in disasters such as Harvey, in a way that goes beyond any one organization. 

What They Knew and When They Knew It - March 30, 2017 - New emails reveal just how soon American officials realized the U.N. had brought cholera to Haiti. What they did next helped pave the way for Trump.

The Truth About the Clintons and HaitiSept. 22, 2016 - Trump has turned Haiti into the new symbol of Bill and Hillary’s crookedness. If only things were that simple.

 

The Killer Hiding in the CDC Map - April 14, 2016 - To understand what’s so insane about it, you need to know a little about two of the maps in that image and the CDC’s history with the epidemic.

Not in the Cards - June 4, 2004 - How the World Series stacks the deck against the gods of poker.

See more of Jonathan's work at slate.com


Haiti's Shadow Sanitation System - March 12, 2014 - Russell Leon works under the cover of darkness as part of a small crew sworn to secrecy. 

Money, Politics, and Pollution in North Carolina - May 7, 2014 - In North Carolina, the debate over whether unrestricted campaign spending represents the flourishing of democracy or its corrosion is not an abstract one. It is literally in the water. 


Who suffers when disasters strike? The poorest and most vulnerable. - Sept. 1, 2017 -Policy decisions about poverty, housing and crisis management hurt low-income victims.


As Republicans lose their grip on North Carolina, they deal one final blow - Dec. 17, 2016 - Republican lawmakers have spent years shifting the state in their favor. But as the tables turn, they’ve taken aim at incoming Democrat governor Roy Cooper.

Black votes matter: the North Carolina electors who say new law is unfair - July 19, 2015 - The month after the US supreme court relaxed oversight of its voting procedures, North Carolina passed a law critics say discriminates against the poor and non-white

Disaster aid: how US charity begins at home - Jan. 11, 2013 - On the third anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, it's time to question the US's helping hand

Jamestown: the settlement's hidden history is threatened by climate change - Aug. 5, 2015 - New discoveries have come amid a race against the vagaries of rising sea levels and the island’s acidic soil

 

See more of Jonathan's work at theguardian.com


The Legacy of a Century-Old War Is Reshaping Power in the Pacific - Aug. 10, 2017 - U.S. news outlets struggled to interpret Duterte's reference to America’s “past sins.” But Filipinos knew what he meant.

What Happens When a Celebrity Becomes President - Feb 9., 2016 - In electing a pop star, whose five-year term ended Sunday, Haitians may have been ahead of the curve.

What General Pershing Was Really Doing in the Philippines - Aug. 18, 2017 - Trump has again circulated a debunked history about terrorism. The real story can tell us something more important about America.


Havana's HotspotsOct. 15, 2015 - Cuba is coming online, but who will control its internet?


How the Apocalypse Will Bring Out the Best in People - April 22, 2016 - After cataclysmic natural disasters, authorities tend to anticipate looting, violence, and a breakdown of social bonds. What they more often find, though, is a rugged spirit of solidarity.

The Supreme Court v. The Paris Agreement - Feb. 12, 2016 - The irony is that no one is more likely to scuttle any nation’s carbon pledge—and the Paris Agreement—than Fox’s core audience in the Republican Party, which sits at a uniquely cozy nexus of energy company money and science denial. 


The Coca-Cola of Disaster Relief: What's the Red Cross Really Doing for Hurricane Sandy? - Nov. 6, 2012 - One important fact hovers over every dollar donated so far: We don't really know how, or if, that money is being spent.

The Celebrity as Hero: When Sean Penn Fought a Phantom Epidemic - Aug. 5, 2013 - Image and resume are always inseparable in Hollywood, and most of us have been living in greater Hollywood all our lives. 


A Seven-Month Wait for LunchJuly 25, 2013 - Why food aid needs to overhaul its delivery system.